Court tours flood control structures

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Members of Limestone County Commissioners Court, the local and state soil and water conservation boards and the Natural Resources Conservation Service tour flood control structures like this one in the northwest corner of the county Monday and Tuesday. The earthen dam can be seen along the horizon; the fishing pier was constructed by the landowner, who also stocked the water in the pool with fish. Mexia News photo/Roxanne McKnight

By Roxanne McKnight
Staff Writer

Several members of Limestone County commissioners court took time Monday after their regular meeting to tour some of the county’s flood control structures, which are all in the northwest part of the county.

County Judge Daniel Burkeen and Commissioner Jerry Allen, whose father was involved in building some of the structures in the 1950s and 1960s, were accompanied by Limestone-Falls Soil and Water Conservation District technician Ed Schwille, who conducted the tour, and members of the local and state soil and water conservation boards as well as representatives of the USDA’s Natural Resource Conservation Service. Commissioners John McCarver and William “Pete” Kirven, and County Engineer Ted Kantor took a similar tour on Tuesday.

The county provides the funding to maintain the 22 structures within the county, and the district does the work of keeping the dams in good order. The tour’s purpose was to familiarize the commissioners with the structures so they would have a good understanding of what needs to be done to maintain the structures and also so the commissioners could see how county money is being used.

The structures are moderately sized earthen dams intended to slow the flow of flood waters in times of heavy rain. They were built on private land with USDA funds. Landowners who have the structures on their property are required by law to allow those who check and maintain the structures to enter their land for that limited purpose.

To read more, pick up a copy of Thursday's The Mexia News, or subscribe to our e-edition.