Letters to the Editor

Fri
15
Aug

Editorial: We reap what we sow

When will we learn that violence only leads to more violence?
People across the nation are protesting over the shooting death of a young African American at the hands of a white police officer in Missouri. It is indeed a tragedy, and not something that should be handled casually, but when you look around our country, can you really say such a thing surprises you?
By default – through our rhetoric, taste for violence in movies and television, and growing gun culture – we create a backdrop for violence.
We should be alarmed when a police officer shoots anyone, especially unarmed individuals, but consider for a moment the culture we ask our officers to operate in today. It is a great responsibility, and we do expect the most from those we entrust to keep us safe, but the stress of that responsibility and the split-second decisions that must be made are horrible to place in anyone's hands.

Fri
02
May

We can't legislate end to racism

Laws will never solve America's problems with discrimination.
Legal protections for racial, ethnic and religious minorities are critical to ensuring some element of protection for these groups, but laws such as the Civil Rights Act and Affirmative Action only serve to remind us we are not beyond our prejudiced past.
Because we have these laws, Americans tend to feel like we are going above and beyond in looking out for the equal opportunity of minorities, but the laws are nothing more than an unsightly bandaid that covers the wounds caused by discrimination. We should not think of equal opportunity as the solution to prejudice. Prejudice goes much deeper than opportunity, it is rooted in how we view and value people different than us. When someone sees a difference – particularly one that affirms the belief that someone else is beneath them – they are showing a prejudice.

Fri
02
May

Helping hand appreciated

The nicest thing happened to me yesterday. I went to the store to buy a few things and as usual bought more than I intended to. When I reached my car, before I could open the trunk, the nicest young boy came up behind me and asked if he could help me.
He unloaded my basket, closed the trunk and took the basket away.
We have so many young people that do so many good things, who never get noticed. Not many, if anyone, saw what he did, but I did and so did God, and he will bless him.
I’ll not forget his smile and his helpfulness. Thanks again.
Aline Sanderson
Mexia

Fri
02
May

Mexia News Editorial

Texas Lemonade has bitter aftertaste

Mon
24
Mar

Context counts

Statements from the Constitution and the Scriptures are frequently used out of context. This is a bad practice because it causes distortions that produce misunderstandings. Written statements and spoken statements should be studied in total context.
The second amendment to the Constitution of the United States is only one sentence long, but we rarely ever hear it. It reads, "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed." Consider the context for this amendment. When our forefathers adopted this amendment more than two centuries ago, this nation had no standing army and weapons designed for the mass destruction of human life had not been developed. It is obvious that our forefathers were primarily concerned with a way to help develop a well regulated citizen's militia to defend the nation. Today we have large military forces and no longer need a citizen's militia.

Mon
24
Mar

Editorial: Military drones on...

Protect those who protect us

Mon
03
Mar

Speak up Tuesday

The primary election is upon us and Tuesday is the last opportunity to cast a ballot that will help set the slate of candidates for the November general election.
In addition to a list of candidates to choose from on both the Republican and Democratic ballots, each include a number of party referendum measures.
While these items are non-binding, they are one way we can send a message to our primary political parties about how we feel regarding certain policy issues. On the Democratic ballot referendum measures deal with immigration reform and wages. On the Republican side they address religious freedom, gun rights, franchise taxes and the Affordable Care Act.
By casting a vote on these issues, we can let our elected officials know where we stand on these issues in broad terms and perhaps help steer future policy in the right direction.

Mon
06
Jan

Contact information important

It was with great approval that I noticed in the Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013 edition of The Mexia News that a very old feature has returned, called “Making Contact.” I do hope this becomes a regular weekly feature or at least a monthly printing.
Thank you so much.
Sincerely,
Bob Thompson
Groesbeck

Mon
06
Jan

Editorial: Stocks soar, most Americans just sore

One of the prime indicators we use to judge American economic health is the U.S. stock market. By stock standards, 2013 was a banner year, seeing a 26 percent annual gain and finishing at a record mark of 16,576.

Do you feel the economy is off and running again? Are your pockets overstuffed with cash? In most of the country – where we don't spend all day trading stocks on Wall Street – we missed out on that historic success.

Corporate America dodged the New Years hangover with a very profitable year in 2013. Walmart saw profits rise 10 percent to $16 billion. The pharmaceutical company Pfizer pocketed $17 billion, and Apple led the top 10 with $46 billion in profit. Among the top 10 were two oil companies, two banks and three computer/software companies. Among them, they earned roughly $240 billion in profits last year.

Mon
06
Jan

Column: Differentiate news from entertainment

By MIKe Eddleman
Editor and Publisher

I don’t care what inspired Miley Cyrus’ hair. I don’t care to see Kim Kardashian’s latest “selfie” or how treacherous Kanye West believes his stage show can be. I don’t care who is pregnant on “Teen Mom,” “Teen Mom 2” or “16 and Pregnant.”
When Justin Bieber wipes out on a skateboard, it is not headline news. Is it important to us to know who the best celebrity dog parents were in 2013?

Before the age of mass media we had a pretty clear definition of news. Today everything is treated like news and we blur the lines of what holds significance in our world. We believe in the United States that we are well-informed, educated consumers of news, but I am not always so sure. It all depends on how we define “news” today.

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